Berries #4

berries (4)
Cotoneaster

A member of the rose family, the cotoneaster bursts into life in May and early June with a profusion of white or pale-pink, flat-petalled blooms, which bees love. With their long-lasting, prolific berries, they are also among the most useful fruiting shrubs in autumn, attractive both to humans and to birds.

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15 Comments Add yours

  1. How pretty. We have cotoneasters here but they are never frosted by snow. The birds love the red berries.

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    1. Heyjude says:

      No snow here yet either, these are a few years old. But plenty of berries around.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Lucid Gypsy says:

    Years ago a house I lived in had a whole wall of espaliered pyracantha, the scent of the flowers wasn’t too nice as you probably know. One harsh winter it was stripped of its berries in a few hours by fieldfares, I was so pleased to have given so many of them a good meal!

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    1. Heyjude says:

      There is a lovely golden pyracantha at the back of me, seems to get deeper orange as the months go by.

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  3. Sammy D. says:

    I LOVE cotoneasters -the name is such fun to pronounce and they are such low-maintenance gems. I did not know they were cousins to the rose!

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    1. Heyjude says:

      I think I was mispronouncing it for years o_O

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      1. Sammy D. says:

        Cotton Easters, heh heh 👍😜🇬🇧

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        1. Heyjude says:

          Was I SO obvious? Hahahah…

          Liked by 1 person

        2. Sammy D. says:

          😍👍. Happt New Year, babe 💞💞🍷🍷🇬🇧

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        3. Heyjude says:

          And you Sammy, I look forward to sharing the year with you. You will be back blogging at some point, won’t you?

          Liked by 1 person

        4. Sammy D. says:

          Uh, not sure. I will write a ‘New Year’s’ post …. eventually …

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        5. Heyjude says:

          When you are ready 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  4. kayrpea61 says:

    Lovely to look at, but a pest in the bush. For that reason, they are a declared environmental weed in most parts of Australia. While once popular in gardens, we are now encouraged to replace them, or at least, not to let the berries form.

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    1. Heyjude says:

      That’s such a shame. We need the berries here to brighten up our dim and dreary winter days 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. pommepal says:

    So cheerful Jude but looks so cold covered in snow.

    Liked by 1 person

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