Macro Monday #34

(click to enlarge to full size)

bindweed-(1)

I was out in the lane near to my new house photographing wild flowers in the hedgerow when I spotted a strange insect on the bindweed. This metallic green one flew in as I was about to take an image of the one feeding on the pollen. But once he had left I went back to the original reddish-green one.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Flower Beetle (Oedemera nobilis) is also known as the thick-legged beetle although it is only males who have this trait. The thick-legged beetle is often known by other names including the swollen-thighed beetle and the false oil beetle and commonly found in the south of England. They prefer open structured flowers such as daisies, roses and cornflowers and obviously, bindweed.

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33 Comments Add yours

  1. elleturner4 says:

    Those thighs!!! I love these beetles-especially the green ones. Great photos 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Sue says:

    Fat thighs!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Heyjude says:

      I’m saying nowt!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Arkenaten says:

    They look similar to Long-Horned beetles. I have a photo of a metallic blue one somewhere.
    Nice capture..

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Amazing close-ups, Jude. Good job they don’t label humans like that. Thick legged and swollen thighed might not go down too well. 😆

    Liked by 1 person

  5. restlessjo says:

    Traffic lights! Just needs amber 🙂 Is bindweed the same as Columbine? I seem to’ve seen lots this year. Got the car sorted?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Heyjude says:

      Can’t do anything about the car until tomorrow, being Bank Holiday today – no point phoning RAC on a BH – tried that before and it was impossible to get through. I’ll ring the VW garage tomorrow and book her in for a new bonnet latch. Hopefully they can do it this week. Then drive v e r y s l o w l y to get there.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Heyjude says:

      Close. Convolvulus. Hedge bindweed which chokes everything! And is virtually impossible to get rid of 😦 Columbine is the pretty ‘Granny’s Bonnet’ or Aquilegia.

      Car booked in this afternoon [sigh of relief…]

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      1. restlessjo says:

        Good-o! 🙂 Mick says it might only need a bit of adjustment. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Heyjude says:

          Mechanics removed it and cleaned and greased all parts including those underneath which I couldn’t get at. All good now, but I haven’t tested it. I am going to leave it well alone until after the trip! Unless I have to refill the windscreen wash 😦

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        2. restlessjo says:

          Steer well clear, just in case 🙂 🙂 Glad you’re good to go.

          Liked by 1 person

        3. Heyjude says:

          So am I – I didn’t sleep well last night and today driving with the ‘hood’ light on was scary. Good job it wasn’t raining because apparently the windscreen wipers don’t work if the ‘hood’ is open. (Obviously German cars use US English). You learn something new every day!

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        4. restlessjo says:

          Eek! Apart from that are you looking forward to the trip?

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        5. Heyjude says:

          I feel a lot more relaxed now. Will reply to your E tomorrow 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

      2. Speaking of Convolvulus, convolveisn’t a common English verb, but it exists:

        http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/convolve

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Heyjude says:

          Just looked it up and it describes how bindweed (Convolvus) behaves exactly! What a wonderful verb!

          Like

      3. Now it devolves upon you to use convolve in a post. I did last year in my other blog:

        https://wordconnections.wordpress.com/2015/01/03/convolve/

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        1. Heyjude says:

          Yes, I was thinking of that!

          Like

        2. Isn’t it great how the world revolves around those of us involved in blogging?

          Liked by 1 person

  6. I love the shimmering green colour. Do these beetles damage the plants?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Heyjude says:

      I don’t think so, I haven’t actually seen any in my garden and if they want to destroy the bindweed I wouldn’t object!

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      1. It would be good if we could have a word with the insects and point them in the right direction of what we wouldn’t mind them eating! 🙂

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  7. I haven’t run across the terms thick-legged or swollen-thighed applied to insects, but in Texas some bugs have been given the epithet leaf-footed (or leaffootted, with three double letters in a row):

    https://portraitsofwildflowers.wordpress.com/?s=leaffooted

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Heyjude says:

      Wow! They are ugly bugs, but I can see how they got the name.

      Like

  8. Wonderful pictures ! I love these colourful beetles, especially when a little bit of sunshine hit their bodies 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Lucid Gypsy says:

    Bindweed is a real pain, I hope the beetles don’t help it spread!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Debra says:

    Very interesting little creatures! I just love the names they go by…I wonder if an insect is as insulted by the description “thick legged” as I would be! 🙂 As insects go, they’re actually quite pretty. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Heyjude says:

      They certainly caught my eye! And as someone who is rather ‘thick-legged’ myself, I’m sure they are not too bothered 😀

      Like

  11. BeckyB says:

    Another world the insect world . . . fascinating, beautiful but sometimes scary! These are gorgeous fellows though 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Heyjude says:

      I still can’t get too close to spiders…

      Liked by 1 person

      1. BeckyB says:

        Depends on the spider for me!!

        Like

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