Garden Portrait: Erddig

Erddig Hall is a National Trust property on the outskirts of Wrexham, Wales. Located 2 miles south of Wrexham town centre, it was built in 1684–1687 for Josiah Edisbury, the High Sheriff of Denbighshire.

House from Canal

The garden and indeed the house, were in disrepair when the estate was handed over to the National Trust in 1973. Nothing but brambles, nettles and overgrown shrubs in this formal garden designed originally by Thomas Badeslade in 1740 in the Dutch style.

Now there is a crisp pattern of paths and lawns, avenues of pleached limes, pyramidal fruit trees, yews and hollies and clipped Portuguese laurels. Apples are grown in abundance with more than 100 varieties, many espaliered along the walled garden. In fact an apple festival is held here annually in October.

The walled garden is also home to one of the longest herbaceous borders you will see and this is a riot of colour in the summer.  Wide borders are filled with spring bulbs and old varieties of daffodils some dating from before the First World War. And the banks of the canal are colonised by the wild Welsh Lent Lily (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) in spring, followed by common spotted orchids in the summer which spread during the period of neglect in the garden.

Bedding schemes favour the Victorian flavour and more so in the small Victorian Flower Garden where pink ‘Dorothy Perkins’ roses and deep violet Clematis Jackmanii are strung along swags of ropes.

If you like walking there are 3 trails taking you through the extensive park where dogs are welcome on leads. This landscape was largely the work of the well-respected landscape designer William Emes, a contemporary of ‘Capability’ Brown, who worked at Erddig from 1768-1780. In 1779, Philip Yorke I put up the following notice at the entrance lodges at Erddig:

“Mr Yorke having at great Expense, and at the labour of many Years, finished the Ground and Wood Walks about Erthig, desires to acquaint his Neighbours, that they are extremely welcome to walk in the same for their Health and Amusement.”

Size: 13 acres (5.3 hectares)

  • Street: Erddig
  • Postcode: LL13 0YT
  • City: Wrexham, Clywyd
  • County: Gwynedd
  • Country: United Kingdom

20 Comments Add yours

  1. restlessjo says:

    What a very nice man was Mr. Yorke! 🙂 🙂 I love your collage!

    1. Heyjude says:

      Wanted to keep the workforce fit and happy 🙂

  2. This makes me wish I lived where there was eternal summer. I love a garden full of flowers. In our previous garden, there was a standard Dorothy Perkins which flowered nearly all year. Maybe I should get another one.

  3. BeckyB says:

    You garden portraits would make a fabulous travel guide, perfect length and stunning photographs. I wonder if we could convince the English Tourist Guide to sponsor it for you?!

    1. Heyjude says:

      Thank you for the compliment Becky. I simply enjoy writing about the gardens I have visited.

      1. BeckyB says:

        We are all so fortunate that you do – just wonderful 🙂

        1. Heyjude says:

          Thank you 🙂

  4. Lucid Gypsy says:

    Formal but nicely done and the red brick house is handsome. This makes me happy 🙂

    1. Heyjude says:

      Good. I like to make people happy 🙂

  5. pommepal says:

    The National Trust do a great job. I think I will put up a sign like Mr Yorke outside our garden….Especially the bit about the labour of many years!!!

  6. Joanne Sisco says:

    Another outstanding garden! My favourite photo is at the top – the scalloped wall with the round centre window. Now, if I had a large property, I too would like a grand feature wall like that!

    1. Heyjude says:

      I like that too, I am imagining a nice potting shed behind this wall 🙂

  7. Great presentation of the garden, Jude. My first encounter with espaliering was at Foxglove Spires at Tilba. And Dorothy Perkins roses were a favourite of my mother’s. I love Philip Yorke’s notice – a far cry from all the appropriating fencing off you see now.

    1. Heyjude says:

      We are lucky here that the National Trust opens a lot of grounds free to wander in, even if they do charge for parking. And I know some people detest the organisation. But they do an awful lot of restoration, and not just in the gardens.

      1. What are the criticisms of the National Trust?

        1. Heyjude says:

          All that goes with a large institution – autocratic, snobbish, out of touch, patronising, middle class – all those things that Britain still suffers from. Here’s an interesting read: https://www.arthistorynews.com/articles/3331_Whats_wrong_with_the_National_Trust

  8. RuthsArc says:

    Thanks for this virtual visit. What a fabulous place and such a lovely day 🙂

    1. Heyjude says:

      We had an interesting time exploring the border country that holiday.

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