Garden Portrait: Le Jardin des Cinq Sens

The garden itself is inspired by the romantic settings of medieval mazes consisting of several intimate gardens with evocative names with an invitation to awake the senses: ‘Jardin du Goût’ (the Taste Garden), ‘Jardin de l’Odorat’ (the Scented Garden), ‘Cloître de plantes médicinales’ (the Cloister of Medicinal Plants), ‘Prairie Alpine’ (the Alpine Meadow), etc.

It is garden which highlights the varied features of the plant world, encouraging you to take time to observe, take stock, absorb and savour the moment. To reach out and touch that furry leaf, smell that perfume, squeeze the oil from that herb and listen to the wind in the trees, the birds in the water, the bubbling stream. You have probably heard about ‘Mindfulness’,an awareness of our thoughts and feelings as they happen moment to moment,” well this garden was designed to reconnect with our bodies and the sensations they experience long before the word came into fashion. Forget your worries for half an hour and  take in the sights, sounds, smells and tastes of the present moment.

It is not a large garden, an hour or two at the most will suffice, unless like me you take time to sit and watch the sparrows in the bird bath, stop to make notes in the herbal garden, sketch (roughly) the way fruit trees are espaliered along fences, the roses cover arches and the way clematis grow through roses or up on a wrought-iron obelisk. If you are stressed when you arrive here you certainly won’t be when you leave, as long as you linger and don’t rush through as some people do, eager to tick off yet another site from their list.

There are actually 9 different individually themed areas to explore which are :

  • The Alpine Garden
  • The Woodland
  • The Woven Garden
  • The Cloister
  • The Garden of Flavours
  • The Garden of Fragrances
  • The Garden of Textures
  • The Garden of Sight
  • The Garden of Hearing

Moving through the ‘rooms’ via cut-out doorways in the neatly trimmed hedges I crunch my way along gravelled pathways with the neat wooden borders of the  raised beds. Some plants I instantly recognise, others I try to work out from the labels. It is a garden with plenty of labels, but they are of course in French and my French is very rusty. But certain words are easy to translate.

This is a leisurely stroll, stopping frequently to smell, to touch, to read, sometimes to backtrack and take another look at something which catches my eye from across the garden. I enjoy the tranquillity of the place taking in the planting combinations: colours used to contrast or complement; the different leaf shapes; shapes and sizes of plants; movement. I notice how the pretty decorative and plain terracotta pots are used to hold the more tender plants such as the scented pelargoniums. I imagine the winters are hard and cruel here.

There are benches within the garden rooms and I make use of them to sit and make notes of the plants I am enjoying. To doze in the warm sunshine, eyes closed, breathing in the fragrant air and listening to the sparrows as they squabble with one another to find space in the bird bath. As usual, the plants that are used for medicinal or fragrances or culinary purposes are the ones I am most attracted to. Even if I don’t make personal use of such plants I like to grow them. Somehow they connect me to the past. I can imagine the medieval  physic gardens with their sections for plants used for healing. I pick. I nibble.

Regrettably I leave.

I have two other posts about this garden and the village in which it is situated.  Lost and Yvoire

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26 Comments Add yours

  1. pommepal says:

    That wander with you through this enchanting garden was pure bliss Jude. It is a garden you will always remember and yes to linger and absorb the beauty, to smell the roses and nibble the herbs, then sit and watch the sparrows at play that is definitely the meaning of “mindfulness”

    1. Heyjude says:

      True PP. I will never forget this garden. There was a sense of quietness, soul, about it. A place to meditate.

  2. Tish Farrell says:

    Splendidly evocative, Jude. Especially the last paragraph.

    1. Heyjude says:

      Thanks Tish. I am often drawn to Physic gardens, or herb gardens. I find the use of plants fascinating.

      1. Tish Farrell says:

        I think communing with healing plants can be very restorative. No need for any song and dance – just being present and paying attention, as you say.

  3. restlessjo says:

    How beautiful! When was this, Jude? Nice to imagine you there on a bench, sketching. 🙂 🙂 Sniffing and nibbling… much more healthy than cake! Are those gourds in the early photo?

    1. Heyjude says:

      September 2009, Jo. And yes gourds and pumpkins. I did actually have cake today, at the Hell’s Mouth café, but it wasn’t as good as I remember, a bit dry ☹ but I had a lovely wander along the cliff watching gulls riding the thermals. Some lovely sunshine between the showers.

      1. restlessjo says:

        Wonderfully changeable here too. Just looked over my shoulder to see a glorious rainbow across a brilliant blue sky. 🙂 🙂

  4. Jude, we find people tell us about a place and say we will only need an hour or two and we always end up taking much longer. Mr ET reads every word on every label or information board, I take a trillion photos and we just enjoy the wander. This garden looks beautiful and I’m not surprised you wanted to linger.

    1. Heyjude says:

      Takes me an awful lot longer too! Are you back in Australia now?

      1. Yes, been back for a week now.

        1. Heyjude says:

          Still acclimatising then! I always feel a bit discombobulated when returning from a long trip. Especially one overseas.

        2. Yes, I know that feeling!

  5. Pat says:

    A delightful post, Jude. I felt myself relax as you walked me through. Thanks.

    1. Heyjude says:

      Thanks for accompanying me Pat 🙂

  6. BeckyB says:

    What a beautiful portrait you have created today, almost felt like I was there. And what a garden . . .if only I had the time, skill and creativity to do something similar.

    1. Heyjude says:

      You need a fair bit of space to create garden rooms, but I do like them.

  7. I can feel the loveliness of this garden (gardens) through your photos – it looks like a wonderful place to visit.

    1. Heyjude says:

      The whole village is lovely. I wish I’d had the chance to visit France more, I like France, the bits I have seen.

      1. I love France too, and have been many times – I’ve seen quite a lot of the country and my love of it started on childhood holidays when we used to drive from Calais to the south and camp.

        1. Heyjude says:

          I would have loved to have done that with my children, but even camping was prohibitively expensive for me.

        2. We always think of camping as a cheap option, but I don’t think it is (unless you are camping in a field with no facilities perhaps!) and I think my parents had to save hard to allow us to do it. It was lovely though – the scenery, the food, the smells, the warmth…

  8. Lucid Gypsy says:

    What a delight, did you know about it first or stumble upon it?

    1. Heyjude says:

      I discovered it when looking for things to see and do in Geneva.

  9. This was a great presentation of this outdoor wanderland. It’s inviting beauty of various natural colors and scents seems to be never ending.
    I will remember it for many reasons. Exceptional photos and story!

    1. Heyjude says:

      Thank you for your visit and lovely comment Eddie.

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