Flashback Friday #38

A post from September 2014 about a rather unusual garden in Herefordshire.  A delightful county to explore if you are ever in the West Midlands. This post was a contribution to the lovely Restless Jo’s weekly walks.


Garden Portrait: Westonbury Mill Water Gardens
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The Water Tower with Gargoyles

Winding paths through the Bog Garden

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Cool, shady areas

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Butterflies Galore

A folly or two

Just a quiet, tranquil space to enjoy the bird song, running water, autumnal light and colours with plenty of benches to sit on and admire the surrounding Herefordshire hills and meadows.

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You will find this unusual garden in the beautiful Welsh Marches close to the ‘Black-and-White’ village of Pembridge.

  • Street:        Westonbury Mill
  • Postcode:   HR6 9HZ
  • City:            Pembridge
  • County:      Herefordshire
  • Country:    United Kingdom

This post is a contribution to Fandango’s Flashback Friday. Have you got a post you wrote in the past on this particular day? The world might be glad to see it – either for the first time – or again if they’re long-time loyal readers.

Garden Portrait: East Lambrook Manor

East Lambrook Manor is a small 15th-century manor house in East Lambrook, Somerset, England. It is surrounded by a “cottage garden” planted by Margery Fish between 1938 and her death in 1969.

The English Heritage Grade 1 listed garden is characterised by many winding paths through abundant borders and is renowned as the premier example of the English cottage garden style. It has noted collections of snowdrops, hellebores and hardy geraniums and there is an excellent specialist hardy plant nursery in the garden.

During the lockdown, due to Covid-19, we had to prebook our garden visits and there were precautions in place to protect visitors. Although the garden has meandering paths throughout the very dense planting, there was a one-way system in place which meant having to rush through at a faster pace than normal so as not to block the route for other people. Luckily we had booked an early slot and the garden was not busy.

Our visit was in late May after a very cold April and a very wet May. I was therefore surprised to see many flowers in bloom which I associate with the summer months and certainly in advance of what I had seen in Cornwall.

It is not a big garden, but there is a lot to see. I couldn’t come away without buying several lovely hardy geraniums and also three Geum plants for my garden. If you are ever in the area I recommend a visit here and there is also a rather nice pub opposite for lunch.

Town: East Lambrook, South Petherton
Postcode: TA13 5HH
County: Somerset
Website: East Lambrook Gardens

 

Flashback Friday #35

 August in Cornwall is the time for the Hydrangea to take centre stage. Everywhere you go you will see large shrubs of this pretty flower in gardens, roadsides and public spaces. This post is from 2019 when visiting gardens was a lot easier than it has been since!


Flower of the Month: August

Looking around the lanes and gardens in August you can’t fail to notice the number of Hydrangeas that are in flower. Here in Cornwall where the temperatures are mild all year round and where there is plenty of moisture they grow into enormous shrubs in colours ranging from the purest white to the darkest purple.

The one place to visit to see these flowers en masse is Trebah Garden on the Helford River. This is when they take centre stage. The plants here are hand pruned in early spring which helps promote the abundance of flowers that remain until long into the autumn. The majority of these were planted in 1949.

Included in the species are H. aspera which has soft velvety leaves. Bees collecting pollen from this plant accumulate a blue sac on each leg rather than the usual yellow.

H. quercifolia has large oak-like leaves which develop burnished tinges in autumn.

H. paniculata “Vanille Fraise” (Strawberry Vanilla) has large panicles of white flowers that turn pink as the summer progresses. This one I have in my own garden.

Hydrangea Valley is filled with plants of all shapes and colours. The pretty ‘Monet’ style bridge provides the perfect place to see them with reflections in the Mallard Pond.

If you want to see more of this lovely garden then please click on this link to my other blog: Cornwall in Colours


This post is a contribution to Fandango’s Flashback Friday. Have you got a post you wrote in the past on this particular day? The world might be glad to see it – either for the first time – or again if they’re long-time loyal readers.

iris extravaganza

Whilst visiting Somerset in the last week of May I was delighted with the amount of late spring / early summer irises in flower. Irises are such beautiful flowers – so many types and colours and textures and contrasting patterns. Early spring Iris reticulata (the dwarf irises) and the summer Dutch irises grow from bulbs and those that grow from rhizomes include bearded irises, beardless like Iris Sibirica, and crested irises. Many have intricate, showy markings on the outer petals, like flowers on a flower.

An iris has two types of petals called ‘falls’ and ‘standards’. The falls are the three petals that are curved downwards – they are falling away from the centre of the flower. The standards are three petals that are standing straight up.

In many iris the standards and falls are quite distinct, but in some, like the Japanese iris, the standards are mostly horizontal and start looking like falls. In all cases the standards are the three upper most petals.

The beard is a fuzzy patch at the base of each falls petal. Locate the falls petal and look at it near the centre of the flower. The beard is usually quite distinct and you can feel the fuzzy hair-like feature. If the petal is not fuzzy, it is not bearded.

Six on Saturday | Orchard flowers

Six on Saturday is hosted by the lovely Jon, AKA ‘The Propagator’ where you find links to many more wonderful garden enthusiasts from all over the world who share six things from a garden on a Saturday. I usually join in from my garden in Cornwall which is recorded on my Cornwall blog, naturally. But this week I shall be travelling home after a week away from the county, the first time in almost a year!

So what better way to re-open my garden blog (which has been dormant for 18 months) than a visit to the lovely orchard in the grounds of Glastonbury Abbey where tree blossom and wild flowers were a heady delight. The scent of cow parsley and hawthorn drifted through the air which was alive with the music from a choir of songbirds.

Hawthorn blossom

“Six things, in the garden, on a Saturday. Could be anything, you decide. Join in!”

See here for the participant’s guide.

Six on Saturday

Most Popular Posts of 2019

 

Last year I did a post about the statistics on my blogs in lieu of the report that WordPress used to send us all at the end of the year so I have had a look at this year’s results. This flower blog has not really been very well visited this year, but that may be due to the fact that I only post weekly now as most of my blogging takes place on my Cornwall blog and I haven’t left the county to visit any other gardens. Flowers on Friday was a new theme this year and regularly attracted 50+ views. The Spiky Squares challenge during March was around about the same.

Most views during the last year (2019)

  1. Flowers in Australia #4
  2. Mrs Greville’s Rose Garden
  3. More from Nymans
  4. Flowers on Friday – Anemone coronaria
  5. Last year’s statistics – Things you have liked
  6. Flower of the Month – January
  7. Cornish Wild Flowers in June
  8. About Page
  9. Flowers on Friday – Foxgloves
  10. Spiky Squares #4 and Flowers on Friday – Helenium

Most of my garden visits tend to be within the county of Cornwall at the moment so they appear on the other blog. I might start doing more macros of flowers and nature which I will post on here, but for now this site will be hibernating until springtime. I thank all of you lovely fellow bloggers who take the time to look at my photos for your visits and especially those of you who comment, it is always nice to know what you are thinking and to have a chat. I wish you all a happy, healthy and nature-filled year ahead.

Flower of the Month: October

There’s not a lot in flower this month so I thought I’d take a look at October birth flowers which are Calendula and Cosmos. I have already featured the lovely Cosmos so I have dipped into my garden files to find some of my Calendula photos.

Marigolds and Borage

Calendula officinalis, the common or pot marigold, is a popular annual plant with yellow to orange daisy- or chrysanthemum-like flowers. The common marigold is still widely used around the world to heal cuts and bruises. Its flowers and leaves are edible, and can be used in soups, salads, and other dishes. It also makes a spectacularly eye-catching garnish.

Marigolds

Because of its resemblance to the sun, it is associated with warmth, love, and creativity.

Flowers on Friday

Ginger Lilies are striking perennials and highly prized for their exotic-looking foliage and brightly coloured flowers.  They will thrive in full sun or light shade where there is a reliable source of moisture in summer and will survive outside in warmer parts of the country if the crown is protected by a dry mulch. In colder areas bring indoors and keep dry throughout winter, or lift the rhizomes and store in a cool, dry place until spring when they can be replanted. They are commonly seen in the gardens of Cornwall where they can grow into very large clumps.

Hedychium gardnerianum Large cylindrical racemes of sweetly scented yellow flowers, each with protruding red stamens, put on a very showy display from midsummer. A vigorous species, the bold foliage will often have a slight blue tint.

Hedychium densiflorum Forming a slowly spreading clump of lustrous foliage, this compact ginger lily is one of the hardier forms. The slender spikes of fragrant, orange-red flowers appear early in the season and tend to open in one impressive flush.

Hedychium flavescens Tall stems are clothed in pointed, lance-shaped leaves, which can grow to 60cm long and have a softly hairy reverse. In late summer or early autumn these stems are crowned with clusters of spicily-scented, creamy-yellow flowers.

 

Flowers on Friday

I have featured this flower before, but couldn’t help photographing some recently in the Lost Gardens of Heligan. I love these flowers and how the petals droop as they age. With their swirling skirts I always think of them as ‘little dancers’.

Helenium ‘Riverton Beauty’: Tall, upright and robust with clear, butter yellow flowers and a central brown cone.

Helenium ‘Riverton Gem’: A tall and robust selection forming a large bush of upright stems with mid green leaves topped with a magnificent display of orange flowers with yellow tips in mid to late summer.

With Storm Lorenzo hitting our shores (my little Aussie grandson thinks it is hilarious that he has a storm named after him), these flowers will probably be finished by the end of the weekend. But hopefully the pictures will brighten up your Friday.