Penlee Memorial Garden

Penlee Memorial Garden

To the western side of Penzance you will find some of the most architecturally stunning houses clustered around Regent’s Square and the surrounding streets. Well worth spending half an hour to explore. In the midst of this area are the Morrab Sub-Tropical Gardens and Penlee  Park within which is Penlee House Gallery and Museum an elegant gallery set within a Victorian house and park. Changing exhibitions mainly feature famous Newlyn School and Lamorna Group artists.

Wandering through the park on the way back to our holiday home in historic Chapel Street, we stumbled across the delightful Memorial Garden, tucked away by the side of the House. There is also the Orangery Coffee Shop, with its sun-bathed terrace overlooking the park, but unfortunately not open on a Sunday afternoon. This Garden of Remembrance was created in the former kitchen and flower walled enclosure which provided produce and flowers for the house all through the year.

(click on an image to enlarge and scroll through the gallery)

There are several benches on which to rest and take in the beauty of the tiny garden. There is also a small chapel of rest, which was closed on my visit and in front of this an unusual Foxglove Tree was in flower. I have never come across this before. It has fragrant, light lilac-purple flowers in large panicles. The garden is full of sub-tropical planting and is a peaceful, sheltered haven. Don’t miss it if you are ever in Penzance. I know that I’d be very happy to sit there for a few hours with a good book.

Advertisements

Morrab Sub-Tropical Garden

Morrab Sub-Tropical Garden

Morrab Gardens started out as the property of wealthy brewer, Samuel Pidwell. Pidwell built Morrab House in 1841 as his home on a three acre strip of land running from the town centre to the sea front. In fact the word Morrab comes from the Cornish for sea-shore (mor = sea and app = shore).

April

We nearly bought  a house overlooking these gardens, but that is another story, and I can’t believe that I have not written a post about them other than a brief mention in my Penzance post on Travel Words.

May

Amongst the fine examples of tender and rare plants are huge examples of the ubiquitous cordyline (or Cornish palm), tree ferns, banana plants and Japanese Bitter Orange.

October

There is a bandstand, a memorial to the Boer War 1904 and a rather splendid fountain with a seal on a ball balancing a fish spouting water in the centre. A very pleasant and popular space in the town where people gather to exercise, picnic and socialise.

Indian Char Bagh Garden

Indian Char Bagh Garden

This garden is one of the Paradise Garden Collection at Hamilton Gardens in New Zealand and follows on from my previous post.

Indian Char Bagh Garden

The ‘char bagh’ or ‘enclosed four part’ garden has been one of the most significant types of traditional garden. Between the 8th and 18th centuries these gardens spread throughout the Muslim world from Asia to North Africa to Spain. They were the original ‘Paradise Gardens‘.

4 part garden

The complex symbolism behind this form of garden has its very ancient roots in three of the world’s great religions – Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. A small hunting palace near Agra, called Lal Mahal, has inspired the Hamilton Garden’s Char Bagh garden.

 

American Modernist Garden

American Modernist Garden

This garden is one of the Paradise Garden Collection at Hamilton Gardens in New Zealand and follows on from my previous post.

American Modernist Garden

Modernist style was an international phenomenon, not just a 20th century American  tradition. Its gardens are focused on relaxed outdoor living, a perfect match to sun soaked, upwardly mobile California. Sunny yellow outdoor chairs, raised deck-like forms, water features and popular culture murals set the scene at Hamilton Gardens.

DSCF9844

Design of modernist gardens is usually related to the use of the garden and they are often dominated by elements like swimming pools, barbecue and outdoor eating areas. There is usually a strong visual and practical relationship between house and garden. The plants used in the Modernist garden were usually native to the local area and this garden is based upon the designs by Californian designer Thomas Church (1902 – 1978) with plants from the south-west of the USA.