Five Minutes with Narcissus

Five Minutes with Narcissus

DesleyJane – a lovely arty scientist now living in Melbourne – is also a wonderful photographer and a huge macro fan. She has a new weekly challenge called “regularrandom for anyone to join in with which involves spending 5 minutes with the subject matter.

Choose a scene or an object and keep fixed on that object, and shoot for just five minutes.   You can move around the object or scene but try not to interfere with it. See what happens in that five minutes, what changes, how the light changes, what comes into the frame or leaves the frame, or what other parts of the object you can focus on or use to your advantage.

Still on the spring theme, this week I am having a play with a vase of narcissus which are currently bringing cheer to my house.

Narcissus is a genus of predominantly spring perennial plants in the Amaryllidaceae (amaryllis) family. Various common names including daffodil, daffadowndilly, narcissus, and jonquil are used to describe all or some members of the genus. Narcissus has conspicuous flowers with six petal-like tepals surmounted by a cup- or trumpet-shaped corona. The flowers are generally white or yellow (orange or pink in garden varieties), with either uniform or contrasting coloured tepals and corona. Wikipedia

All photos were taken using my Macro 60mm lens and an art effect on the Olympus E-10 camera.

If you would like to join in then please visit DJ’s site where you will find more information and ideas about this fun challenge which doesn’t have to involve macros.

Five Minutes with snowdrops

Five Minutes with snowdrops

DesleyJane – a lovely arty scientist now living in Melbourne – is also a wonderful photographer and a huge macro fan. She has a new weekly challenge called “regularrandom for anyone to join in with which involves spending 5 minutes with the subject matter.

Choose a scene or an object and keep fixed on that object, and shoot for just five minutes.   You can move around the object or scene but try not to interfere with it. See what happens in that five minutes, what changes, how the light changes, what comes into the frame or leaves the frame, or what other parts of the object you can focus on or use to your advantage.

Bearing this in mind during a recent visit to a Cornish garden (Trebah) the following are my 5 minutes with snowdrops.

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Having wandered around the garden for an hour or so, I found a clump of snowdrops high enough on a bank behind a bench that I could focus on. Fortunately there was hardly a breath of wind, but the sun was behind a cloud to begin with and then came out again. Although my focus was on the flowers themselves, I did become a little distracted by the water droplets on some of them.

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All photos were taken using my Macro 60mm lens. First time out this year. There were more shots taken in the five minutes, but some were a lot less than perfect. Methinks I need to practice.

If you would like to join in then please visit DJ’s site where you will find more information and ideas about the challenge.

Wild flower portrait: Winter Heliotrope

Wild flower portrait: Winter Heliotrope

Winter heliotrope (Petasites fragrans) is found in damp places such as hedgerows and woodlands where it forms large patches of heart or kidney-shaped leaves. Petasites is from the Greek petasos, a broad-brimmed hat worn by shepherds. Fragrans of course means fragrant. It has hairy stems and pretty star-shaped flowers that have a delightful vanilla scent, though only male flowers are produced in the UK. True heliotropes are in the borage family, winter heliotropes in the daisy family. Though heliotrope is also used to describe the colour ‘pink-purple

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It was introduced, as an ornamental from the Mediterranean and North Africa and is now naturalised in lowland Britain though not frost resistant so very rarely found in the north of the country.

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It is one of the earliest sources of nectar for insects, flowering in January through to March. I discovered these clumps in the hedgerow near Trencrom Hill.

My first wild flower of the year. And not one to introduce to the garden as apparently they spread at an alarming rate and are difficult to eradicate. They are pretty though.