Square in September

Becky from “A life of a 40 something” is posting a flower a day throughout September, in the square format. She’d love you to join her.
day two

Osteospermum

The centres of these delightful, long-lasting African daisies are often a delight with their unusual colours. Next time you pass some, stop and have a closer look.

Another visit to St Michael’s Mount

Gazanias

A second visit to the mount on an overcast day in June meant that most of the Gaillardia (Blanket flower) and the Osteospermum (African Daisy) daisy-like flowers were tightly closed, but the succulents were flowering and there were some noticeable changes to the garden since my visit at the end of April . There is plenty to grab your attention in June including lots of colour.

On entering the terraces the first thing you notice are the banks of bright pink flowers of Lampranthus haworthioides (header photo) and the tall spires of the pinky-purple echium that reach out over the cliff to the sea. Climbing the steep routes up the cliff bring you close to the flowering aloes, agaves and other succulents and in amongst these are the more unusual flowers such as Kangaroo Paw (normally associated with Australia) or leucadendron argenteum, the silver-leaf protea from South Africa.

Osteospermum

The name Osteospermum is derived from the Greek o’steon’ (= bone) and Latin ‘spermum’ (= seed). Osteospermums belong to the daisy family ( Compositae / Asteraceae), hence their common names: African Daisy or South African Daisy, Cape Daisy and Blue-eyed Daisy.

Osteospermum

July

Growing African daisies require conditions similar to those found in Africa. It likes heat and full sun. It needs well-drained soil and, in fact, will tolerate dry soils. The ones with the blue ‘eye’ tend to be the most hardy, but in the UK they are mostly treated as annuals.

Osteospermum: Whirligig

Nasinga Purple variety – also known as the Spoon Daisy.

whirligig Nasinga Purple variety

Here are a couple more including white or cream ones.

The name Osteospermum is derived from the Greek osteon (= bone) and Latin spermum  (= seed). Osteospermums belong to the daisy family ( Compositae / Asteraceae), hence their common names: African Daisy or South African Daisy, Cape Daisy and Blue-eyed Daisy.