Flowers on Friday

If you are looking for something different to grow on an obelisk, cane teepee or trellis then why not try a Black-eyed Susan. Thunbergia is completely unrelated to Rudbeckia hirta, an herbaceous annual or short-lived perennial in the daisy family.

thunbergia grandiflora

Above is Thunbergia grandiflora an evergreen vine. The blue to mauve flowers are about 8 cm across with a 4 cm long tube that is pale yellow inside. Common names include Blue Skyflower and Skyvine. It is a houseplant in temperate climates.

thunbergia-alta

Thunbergia alata – Black Eyed Susan is a herbaceous perennial climbing plant species in the Acanthaceae family. An eye-catching day beautiful five petalled flower with a jet black eye. This easy annual used to be regarded as a conservatory climber for growing in tubs, soil borders or from hanging baskets, but in recent years it has become a popular subject for outdoor cultivation, both in baskets, pots and in more protected corners of the garden

Thunbergia salmon shades

Thunbergia alata salmon shades

T. ‘Salmon Shades’ is a tender, evergreen, twining climber, often grown as an annual, with triangular to ovate, toothed, dark green leaves and, from summer to autumn, flowers in shades of pale yellow, salmon, and pink until the first frosts. A similar variety is T. alata ‘African Sunset’ which has flowers in all the colours of a spectacular sunset and looks lovely with other apricot and purple shades.

Macro Monday #99

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Clerodendrum splendens (glory treeflaming glorybower) is a species of flowering plant in the genus Clerodendrum of the family Lamiaceae, native to tropical Western Africa. It is a twining evergreen climber, growing to 3 metres (9.8 ft) or more, with panicles of brilliant scarlet flowers in summer. With a minimum temperature of 10 °C (50 °F), it requires the protection of glass during the winter months in most temperate regions.
Wikipedia

Macro Monday #87

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I only wish my clematis would grow like this, smothered in blooms. This was seen growing on a wall in Mousehole. It’s mauvish-crimson colour screams at you and the silky, velvety iridescent flowers are majestic as you get close to them. Though I do now see that something has had a nibble.

garden photography: so sweet

June is all about ‘the essence of summer’

(This month I want to see what summer means to you. Still focussing on the garden or parkland let your photographs tell me your story of summer-time wherever in the world you live. )

My last summer essence is another scented flower. The sweet-pea (Lathyrus odoratus). Not only does this lovely annual climber come in jewel box colours and delightful fragrances, it also holds lots of childhood memories for me as my dad used to grow them on cane wigwams in the back garden and he used to let me pick posies for my mother.

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I love to try and grow them myself, but this year’s lot went in a little late so I’m not expecting any flowers any time soon!

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If you would like to join in with Garden Photography then please take a look at my Garden Photography Page. No complicated rules 🙂

  • Create your own post and title it JuneThe Essence of Summer
  • Include a link to this page in your post so others can find it too
  • Add the tag “GardenChallenge” so everyone can find the posts easily in the WP Reader
  • Get your post in by the end of the month, as the new theme comes out on the first Sunday in July.
  • Please visit the sites in the comments to see what others are posting.

Thanks to everyone who has shared their essence of summer with me, it has, as always, been a delight to visit gardens and flowers from around the world. Next month I am looking for something from the edible garden – an allotment, herb gardens, a tomato plant, a rice terrace in China, a field of corn; you decide.

Macro Monday #16

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creeper

I thought this might be the Flame Lily ( Gloriosa superba) before fully opened, but I am not so sure. Any ideas? In the glasshouse at RHS Wisley and definitely tropical.

(With the opening of my new Cornish blog I have decided to  abandon the 60mm macro site and will in future post macro images on the site I consider the most appropriate. )

Berries #2

berries (1)

English ivy (Hedera helix)

it is hailed as one of the best plants for wildlife. Its evergreen, waxy foliage provides shelter for birds to nest and insects to hibernate, and it also provides food for caterpillars of the holly blue butterfly and the double-striped pug, swallow-tailed and yellow-barred brindle moths. Calorie-rich ivy berries are loved by birds, including the song thrush, mistle thrush, redwing, blackbird and blackcap.

 

C is for Clematis

There are many different varieties of clematis and colours range from white through to pink, deep reds, blues to purples. There are also yellow varieties too. Several are known as ‘Old Man’s Beard’ because of their distinctive seed-heads.

Clematis tangutica  is a very popular variety when people look for a species to grow up trees and other tall shrubs/ plants. Its yellow nodding bells are in abundance from July to Sept (then the seedheads are there for the rest of the year after that).

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