Garden Portrait: Summer at Hinton Ampner

The walled kitchen garden is full of lavender-edged borders and swaying grasses and the Norman church is now surrounded by greenery. Pear trees that were in blossom in the spring, now drip with ripening fruit.

In July the garden is transformed. Around the house and the terraces shrubs give way to bedding plants, perennials, delicate shades of roses, lilies, dahlias, agapanthus, lupins and alliums.

At the east side of the house is a lily pond, and to the front a grass terrace with views over the parkland.

A sunken garden which was cordoned off in the wet weather to prevent damage to the lawned pathway is now open.

The terraces are full of summer planting, and ornaments that went unnoticed in the spring.

 

The smoke bushes are in full bloom next to the classical temple.

It is a peaceful and relaxed garden in which to loiter. Sheep wander among the trees in the parkland and a ginger cat gets some shut-eye in the heat of the sun.

Hinton Ampner has been creatively planted and tended with so much to see in quite a small garden. If you are in the area during the summer months I recommend a visit. And next door is a lovely pub, the Hinton Arms,  which serves excellent food.

Size: 13 acres (5.3 hectares)

  • Street:   Hinton Ampner
  • Postcode:   SO24 OLA
  • City:   Bramdean, Alresford
  • County:   Hampshire
  • Country:  United Kingdom

Tree Series #24

Butser Hill, a chalk hill in Hampshire, close to the Surrey/West Sussex county borders, is the second highest point of the South Downs (Blackdown is the highest). It is located within the borders of the Queen Elizabeth Country Park, situated about three miles south of the historic market town of Petersfield. Once close to where we lived it provided the location for a lovely walk with amazing views as far as the south coast towards Portsmouth on a clear day.

The name Butser comes from the Old English Bryttes Oran meaning Briht’s slope. Oran or Ora is Old English for flat topped hill and/or steep slope

 

Garden Portrait: Spring at Hinton Ampner

This Georgian house stands on a ridge of chalk above well-treed farmland in Bramdean, Hampshire. It was inherited by Ralph Dutton, the 8th and last Lord Sherborne, in 1935 and he devoted the next fifty years to improving it. Author of ‘The English Garden’ he produced a very elegant house, landscaped gardens and parkland.

On one side of the house is a walled kitchen garden which runs into a cherry orchard, backed by a Norman church. The trees are planted within four formal enclosures and is the pattern for many compartmentalised planting within the grounds and long sweeping axes lined by topiary.

Further terraces were created using the lines of the Georgian facade to form the central space and the cross-paths. It is beautifully designed and holds a whole host of shrubs including the smoke-bush, hydrangeas, pittisporum, philidalphus, berberis, cotoneaster and many different shrub roses.

In spring the attention is given to the trees, the shrubs and the topiary. With spring bulbs and blossom adding colour.

The Long Walk runs through an avenue of thirty clipped Irish yews in one direction and through oramental shrubberies in the other. Both culminating with a classic ornament. One backed by trees, the other by open parkland.

An opening in the hedge opposite the house brings you to the ha-ha and a grass bastion. Ahead the park merges into the Hampshire countryside past stands of beech, lime, oak and pine trees.

The garden is beautifully designed, further enhanced by a flight of stone steps providing a change of level and at an intersection a classical temple has been erected, offering a shady spot to rest and admire the views. Dutton was a huge fan of trees and made sure they were rigorously thinned to ensure the specimens had room to develop. The garden and the parkland provide a sense of history and spaciousness with plenty of room for a pleasant stroll.

Size: 13 acres (5.3 hectares)

  • Street:   Hinton Ampner
  • Postcode:   SO24 OLA
  • City:   Bramdean, Alresford
  • County:   Hampshire
  • Country:  United Kingdom

garden photography: New Forest

During November I want to see trees or leaves or anything found in a woodland environment

(this can include individual trees or leaves or woodland/forest views, fungi, wildlife or wildflowers – it can be of an autumnal flavour or anytime in the year, up to you)

new-forest

Four years ago I was lucky enough to visit the New Forest for my youngest son’s wedding. As it was the same time as my birthday we decided to book into a B&B for a week to allow us time to explore this beautiful natural area. In 1079 William The Conqueror came to The New Forest and named the area his ‘new hunting forest’ – 1000 years later his ‘Nova Foresta’ is one of the few places in England where the ancient landscape has remained relatively unchanged by modern day society. You will still find a mass of beautiful woodlands and heathlands as well as wildlife, such as ponies, pigs, cattle and deer roaming the land and delightful towns and villages to explore.

dscf4810

If you would like to join in with Garden Photography then please take a look at my Garden Photography Page. No complicated rules🙂

  • Create your own post and title it NovemberWoodland
  • Include a link to this page in your post so others can find it too
  • Add the tag “GardenChallenge” so everyone can find the posts easily in the WP Reader
  • Get your post in by the end of the month, as the new theme comes out on the first Sunday in December.
  • Please visit the sites in the comments to see what others are posting.

Autumn Beauty: Sedum ‘Herbstfreude’

‘Herbstfreude’ is an herbaceous perennial forming a clump to 60cm in height, with fleshy, oblong, glaucous green leaves and large flat terminal clusters of starry flowers in early autumn. The flowers open from greenish-pink buds, rapidly progressing through pale pink to become deep pink and ultimately taking on a brownish hue

sedum